By Amy Saulino
25th July 2016

I’ve been working in recruitment for 3 years, throughout that time I have come across plenty of “perfect candidates” as well as those deemed “difficult”. It’s true that recruiters and our industry in general don’t have a great name, but if candidates are willing to work with us and not against us, we can build a better name for ourselves... We are not all the same and ethical recruiters do really exist!

Working with a recruiter is, as the title says, a two way street. If a candidate wants us to help them, they need to be willing to let us help and understand what role we play in finding them their dream role. I’m sure all recruiters, like me, have a checklist in their head for that dream candidate.

Good manners

I have and will always continue to say that manners cost nothing. I’m always polite and courteous no matter the situation and I always expect the same back from candidates. At KDR we try to get back to everyone who contacts us and I believe if I contact a candidate, even if they are not interested or looking for a new job anymore they should let me know – even if it’s via an email. Which leads me on to my next point…

Keep me updated

Again, I will always keep people updated on their applications, even when there is no news I will call to say so and not to worry. I would also expect this on the other hand if a candidate is no longer looking for a job but is in the process with KDR I want to be updated so I can inform the client as soon as possible and look at other options.

Don’t waste my time

I would never dream of wasting a candidate’s time by putting them forward for a role that obviously isn’t for them, and I hope a candidate would never dream of wasting my time by applying for job and going to a final stage interview to “change their mind” and pull out after a job has been offered. This is a serious process and needs to be taken as such.

This article is about working together openly and honestly from both angles. That’s something I always ensure I do with candidates and clients alike. Whilst many people tar all recruiters with the same brush and we have a horrendous stigma attached to ourselves as an industry as a whole, we are not all the same and can work much better if both parties communicate effectively with one another. This is about treating each other how you’d like to be treated. 

Recruitment: two-way street

Do you have a dream recruiter checklist? Let me know in the comments below

This blog was originally published on LinkedIn by Amy. To read the original blog click here

Comments

"I think dropping out of the process is always point of contention. Candidates have the right to drop out for a number of reasons sometimes because the process hasn't been transparent and roles are sold to candidates based on untruths; essentially they'll find out sooner or later. Recruiters try to control this (because it translates financially in a very personal way) and the fact is you can't and just need to accept it - I think being aggressive or applying any kind of negative pressure on candidates is extremely unprofessional. A job a very important part of your life, should be treated with respect and shouldn't be treated in a Machiavellian way by recruiters throwing tantrums because people exercised free will." - Shaun Ryan

"Hi Shaun Ryan, I totally understand the angle you are coming from; from my side (I am speaking for myself) I will always be transparent with candidates about the process on what either is or isn't happening for whatever reasons they might be - and I never miss-sell jobs, although I know a lot of recruiters do. All I ask for and all I am saying is that I expect the same in return so that it is a better working relationship and so that we both know where we stand throughout the process of working together. 

Of course, candidates have the right to drop out if they are no longer interested, find another role or are offered something else; I just want to know about it so that I can move on and speak with other people who are interested! :)
I know I certainly don't have pushy or aggressive approach to working with candidates because like you say, people have their own free will and can ultimately do whatever they want to do!" - Amy Saulino (in reply to Shaun Ryan)

"Amy Saulino problem is you can't tell the good ones from the bad ones. Our dealings I have to say you're head and shoulders above the others :) if there was a way to officially differentiate the good from the bad in recruiting I think it would good for your industry" - Shaun Ryan (in reply to Amy Saulino)

"Nice piece Amy Saulino; I know it's written from the heart. I also know that if all recruiters took as much time to understand their candidates as you do, along with the pride that you get from 'doing a good job' then our industry wouldn't suffer from the image problem that it does :-)" - Mark Dexter

"Thank you Mark Dexter! Very much appreciated :)" - Amy Saulino (in reply to Mark Dexter)

"A large amount of my connections on LinkedIn are recruiters and that's no bad thing, but having had a lot of exposure to many different recruiters I know that there is quite a variance in quality (to candidate and client). There are probably a handful of those that I have marked as my go to resources if ever needed purely based on the way first contact was handled. Knowing what know about Amy (from a few discussions), there's a lot of truth in this article, nicely done." - Peter Janes

"Thank you Peter Janes, I totally agree with you RE the variance in quality. I hope you are well!" - Amy Saulino (in reply to Peter Janes)

"My attitude is that I will only apply for a position if I have a good chance of getting an interview. I won't apply for dozens of roles and at the end of the day it is about quality, not quantity." - David Bowman

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