Redundancy
By Gemma Morris
22nd April 2014

If you've just been made redundant, or advised it’s a possibility, it’s crucial to know what your redundancy rights are.

Legally, employers are subject to certain conditions when making layoffs, and while the exact terms will vary depending on the situation, you’ll want to review the rules to be sure your redundancy rights are being respected.

When you are made redundant, it must be according to certain criteria – e.g., because your job position has been eliminated. Unfair selection would include being made redundant based on gender, age, disability, or trade union status. You have the right to a consultation with your employer, and they are required to try to offer you the option to move into an alternative situation within the company, or time off work to look for a new job.

You may be entitled to redundancy pay as well, if you have been in continuous employment at your job for at least two years, or if you have a fixed contract of two years or more that has expired due to redundancy. Whatever the notice period in your employment contract, you are entitled to a statutory minimum of 1 week for every year you’ve worked, up to a maximum of 12 weeks.

These are just some examples of your rights, and as we said, they can vary depending on your situation. To learn more about your rights, we recommend you start with the overview on the Gov.uk website here and the helpful section on redundancy pay on the NI Direct site here. And this Guardian article on the myths surrounding redundancy rights has some good insights as well, including how redundancy affects your clients, social media accounts, and references.

Moving on

Losing your job is a hardship, certainly. But change, while disconcerting, can also open up your horizons in ways you never anticipated. This could be the perfect chance to try something new, apply for a more senior position elsewhere, or train to learn new skills that will make you more attractive to potential employers.

In addition, contracting for a few months may be an appealing option, particularly if money is tight, and can give you the breathing space you need while you work out your next move.

Your recruiter, of course, will be an invaluable partner in this journey. At KDR Recruitment, we offer those who have been made redundant our insight and experience into the current market, as well as our knowledge of employers in the industry. If you’re not sure where to start, contact your recruiter for advice and support as you begin the process of moving on. 

We’d love to hear from you on this. If you were made redundant, what steps did you take to start over? What’s the best advice you heard, and did you find a more positive outcome than you expected? Let us know.

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